Spirituality at Saint Paul's

We are on Summer schedule until October

During Summer months we have a single Sunday morning service, at 9 a.m. It is a Rite II worhip service, with organ and or piano.

Two distinctive Eucharistic liturgies (ritualistic spiritual worship services) are offered at St. Paul's every Sunday morning during "season."

Here's how they differ:

The 7:45 a.m. service is Rite I. If you are attracted to the English language as used for the past 500 years, Rite I might be your choice. It is a quiet, sober and contemplative worship of The Transcendent God.

Our 10 a.m. service uses Rite II, a more contemporary English polished over our long history of worship in the vernacular. In "season," November through April, the organ or piano accompany the choir to enhance the liturgy.

If you are from the Roman Catholic or Lutheran tradition, you will feel right at home here. Even if you've never been inside a church and are now discovering your spirituality, you will be welcome at St. Paul's. A printed guide, or worship bulletin, is provided to help you follow the service.

All baptized Christians are welcome to receive God's gift of Holy Communion.

Click here for a map

For information about our Sunday evening service in the Creole language, click here.

What's an Episcopalian?

How can we say we're both catholic and protestant? It's not that complicated. We walk "the middle way."

Episcopalians are a part of a world-wide association of churches called collectively, "The Anglican Communion." We share certain characteristics and modes of worship that are distinctive and share a common communion. We are liturgical, creedal and scriptural.

One unique feature of being Anglican/Episcopalian is our polity (the churchy word for policy). We retain the ancient three-fold ministry of bishops, priests and deacons, but authority and responsibility are not functions of our clergy alone. We believe strongly in governance by the entire church, not just its leaders. No bishop may claim a superior status over another and no bishop gets to be a bishop unless elected by both clergy and laity. No priest may "rule" over his/her parish; authority is shared between the clergy and the parish council (we call it a vestry) and the same applies all the way up. In this way, all members of the Church are and may be held accountable to the others.

There are other things which mark us as different. We invite you to check us out at St. Paul's. There's room here for you, your questions and even your doubts!

Curry

'This is the Jesus Movement'

Bishop Michael Curry, right, was installed in November 2015 as the primate of the Episcopal Church. Click his photo for a short video in which he sets the tone for our Church.

The first African-American presiding bishop, Curry replaced Bishop Katharine Jefforts Schori, the first woman primate.